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    William Stanley Haseltine

    19th Century American Dusseldorf school of painting Fine Art Hudson River School Interior Decorating Luminism Paintings William Stanley Haseltine

    William Stanley Haseltine

    William Stanley Haseltine lived between June 11, 1835 and February 3, 1900 and was an American painter and draftsman who was associated with the Düsseldorf school of painting, the Hudson River School and Luminism.  Click here to view all of the works of art we have by William Stanley Haseltine for sale. EARLY LIFE AND EDUCATION Born in Philadelphia to John Haseltine, a successful businessman, and Elizabeth Shinn Haseltine, an amateur landscape painter, Haseltine studied at the University of Pennsylvania and then at Harvard University, where he received a degree in 1854. CAREER He first exhibited his paintings the following year...

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    Federal Style Furniture and Architecture

    American Antiques Architecture Federal Furniture Greek Interior Decorating Roman

    Federal Style Furniture and Architecture

    The Federal look is a unique American subset of neoclassicism, which initially emerged and flourished roughly between 1780 and 1820.  More formal than earlier American Colonial design, and less decorative than the concurrent Georgian aesthetics, Federal pieces often include ancient architectural details such as columns, arches and urns, and offer an atmosphere of refined, yet comfortable, luxury.  Though Federal pieces often drew from European influences, it primarily referenced and interpreted the aesthetics of Ancient Greece and Rome – in many ways a political statement emphasizing the allusion to these ancient archetypal democracies, which would have been apparent during the time...

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    Neoclassical Furniture of the American Federal Period

    American Antiques Duncan Phyfe Federal Furniture Hepplewhite Interior Decorating Neoclassical Sheraton

    Neoclassical Furniture of the American Federal Period

    The term “Federal” references the period following the Revolutionary War rather than one specific style of furniture. During those subsequent decades when America was in its infancy, the country was not only defining its government but also its way of life. The decorative arts at this time moved away from the ornate looks of the past, such as the heavily carved and massive look of Rococo pieces, and embraced rising Neoclassicism. According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, further defining the period as American Neoclassicism, Federal styles varied from town to town. Closely studying the styles popular...

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